Summer Education Series 2022

Bees, Bees, Bees – A Free public workshop

Jenna Braun,

Saturday August 27, 10 am.

Jenna and her able assistant will be back by popular demand on

Saturday August 27, and no one knows bees like Jenna.  When one thinks of bees we tend to think of the honey bee, however there are 800 bee species in Canada if which over 400 are in Ontario.

Our native bees range in size from the 25mm carpenter bee to the tiny 5 mm solitary bee, and many of the species can be found at the Urquhart Butterfly Garden and you can see them up close and personal with Jenna.

Numbers of native bee are in serious decline, due to habitat loss and land fragmentation plus the use of pesticides.  Unfortunately 12 bee species have recently been added to creatures at risk in Ontario.

Native bees are our most important pollinators, so there is cause for great concern when species are declining. They not only pollinate wildflowers but also the crops we eat.   Listen and look on Saturday 27 as you learn more about the many bee species at the Urquhart Butterfly Garden, and find out how you can help encourage bee preservation, even if you only have a balcony.

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There is lots of free parking and the site is conveniently accessible by bus or bike. Please bring a chair and wear a hat – you will spend an hour in full sun.

The event will NOT proceed in the event of rain.

For more information contact: Joanna Chapman, 905-627-8917

or jfcchapman@gmail.com

Nature in the Garden

Brian Wylie

Free Workshop Saturday August 20, 10 am

It is not every naturalist who really loves answering questions from kids, but Brian Wylie really does!  When Brian was a young child he used to sit patiently beside local ponds to see what lived there, and has been a keen naturalist ever since. 

August is the end of summer and the Urquhart Butterfly Garden is seeing lots of action, rare butterflies, insects of every type, cicadas emerging, spiders spinning.  There are many flowers in bloom and the observant will see hummingbirds flitting about.

This is the time of year when snakes can be seen sunning themselves on the rocks, but they often return into hiding if they detect sound or movement, so one must move slowly and carefully in order to see them.

There are finches on the very tall flowers and you may see other birds gathering for the fall migration.  A trained eye like Brian Wylie’s can spot wildlife that many people might not notice.

Join him on August 20, 10 am


The session is free and open to all. You are requested to bring a chair and wear a hat. You will spend 1 hour in the full sun of the garden. The event will be cancelled in the event of rain.

The Urquhart Butterfly Garden is immediately adjacent to Centennial Park and the Hamilton Air Force Association at 128 King St. E in Dundas.

There is plenty of free parking and the location is easily accessible by public transportation or bicycle.

Sponsored  by the Dougher Foundation & Hamilton Naturalist’ Club …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

For more information contact: Joanna Chapman
jchapman@295.ca
905-627-8917

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